$62.99
MSRP: $80.00
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M1873 Single Action Buntline Special .45 caliber Replica Revolver Black

(4 reviews) Write a Review
SKU:
22-7303
Type:
Non-Firing Replica
Cannot Ship To:
NJ, NYC, RI
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$62.99
MSRP: $80.00
You save $17.01

Pre-Ordered, Expected ship date: 02/15/2023

Details

SKU:22-7303

Details

SKU:
22-7303
Type:
Non-Firing Replica
Cannot Ship To:
NJ, NYC, RI

Description

Fires Caps!

Also known as "Single Action Army" and initially used by the US army, it is the quintessential revolver and possibly the first reliable handgun in history. It was manufactured with different barrel lengths: short version, 4.75 inches, the longer forms, of 5.5 and 7.5 inches, or the imposing "Buntline Special", 12 inches, used by the legendary Wyatt Earp Service with the Peace Commission of Dodge City; It has received several nicknames: "Frontier" or "Widow maker". The fact that it used the ammunition of the same caliber than the Winchester rifle M1873 used, made it become the most famous gun in the Old West. The film industry mythologized the "Peacemaker" in westerns films of the 40s and 50s.



Features

  • IMposing 12" Barrel

  • Actual size and weight with working mechanism

  • Manufactured from quality wood and metal by dedicated craftsmen at Denix

  • Cannot fire and cannot be altered to fire live rounds




  • Measurements
  • Barrel Length: 12"

  • Overall Length: 18"

  • Weight: 2.5 lbs.





  • 4 Reviews

    View All
    • Susan Sweeeney - Apr 5th 2022

      5
      Buntline Special .45

      I've wanted one of these for some time. However, not having a spare $250K lying around, I went in search of a replica. This is absolutely the very very best of those that I found and well worth the money. I am proud to display it!

    • Steve F. - Feb 22nd 2021

      5
      This is a quality replica of the Buntline.

      This Buntline replica can be a ''cap'' gun too. I used roll caps by placing them in front of the hammer. This is a loud cap gun ! The smoke from the caps is a nice effect. Nice replica of a famous firearm...

    4 Reviews

    • Susan Sweeeney - Apr 5th 2022

      5
      Buntline Special .45

      I've wanted one of these for some time. However, not having a spare $250K lying around, I went in search of a replica. This is absolutely the very very best of those that I found and well worth the money. I am proud to display it!

    • Steve F. - Feb 22nd 2021

      5
      This is a quality replica of the Buntline.

      This Buntline replica can be a ''cap'' gun too. I used roll caps by placing them in front of the hammer. This is a loud cap gun ! The smoke from the caps is a nice effect. Nice replica of a famous firearm...

    • WARREN - Mar 24th 2017

      5
      The Wyatt Earp Special

      Wyatt Earp carried several different pistols. It depended on the situation. The Buntline Special was mostly used to pistol whip anyone getting out of line. Mr. Earp was a quiet type person. It's the quiet type that should be the one you would watch your back. Loud mouths like the coward Ike Clanton was not much of a worry to the Earp Brothers. Ike was just a loud drunk who shot off his mouth more than he shot a pistol. The Cowboy's who would shoot you in the back and laugh about it were; Tom and Frank McLaury; William "Curly Bill" Brocius; "Buckskin Frank" and Johnny Ringo. Cochise County Sheriff Johnny Behan was a political coward. He had a high paying job but seldom ever enforced the county laws because he associated with The Clanton's, McLaury's, Curly Bill, and Johnny Ringo. In the movie "Tombstone" they credited "Doc" Holiday as Johnny Ringo's killer. The truth is, on July 14, 1882, Ringo's body was found by a neighboring property owner lying against the low fork of the trunk of a large tree in West Turkey Creek Valley, near Chiricahua Peak Arizona. The neighbor had heard a single gunshot around 2 o'clock on the afternoon before the body was found. His feet were wrapped in strips of cloth torn from his undershirt, probably because his horse had gotten loose from its picket and bolted with his boots tied to the saddle—a method commonly used at that time to keep scorpions out of them. There was a bullet hole in his right temple and an exit wound at the back of his head. His revolver had one round expended and was found hanging by one finger in his hand. His horse was found two miles away with his boots still tied to the saddle. A coroner's inquest officially ruled his death a suicide. Wyatt Earp got out of being a Lawman and married a prostitute, and charmer by the name of Josephine Marcus. Josephine was born in New York to a Prussian Jewish family. She moved to Tombstone, AZ. with the promise from County Sheriff John Behan that he would marry her. But when she arrived in Tombstone Behan went back on his promise to marry her. Josephine and Wyatt moved from place to place throughout their life, from one boomtown to another, until they finally bought a cottage in the Sonoran Desert town of Vidal, California on the Colorado River, where they spent the cooler seasons. In the summer they retreated to Los Angeles, where Wyatt struck up relationships with some of the early cowboy actors, including William S. Hart and Tom Mix. Wyatt traveled around Los Angeles to movie sets where they were filming cowboy movies. Wyatt tried to negotiate his life's story to several motion picture companies but there were no takers. However, Wyatt was hired many times by different motion picture companies as a "Technical Director". Josephine went to San Francisco in March 1882 and was joined that fall by Wyatt, with whom she remained in a common-law marriage for 46 years until his death January 13,1929, Los Angeles, CA. Wyatt is buried in a Jewish Cemetery financed by his wife Josephine Marcus-Earp. Josephine Marcus-Earp died December 19, 1944, in Los Angeles, CA. Both Wyatt and Josephine are buried in the Marcus Family Plot. When Wyatt died, she secretly buried him in the Marcus family plot in the Jewish Hills of Eternity Memorial Park in Colma, California. Her body was cremated and buried next to Wyatt's remains. You've heard the legends, now you've heard the truth. The COLT Buntline 44 became Wyatt's trade mark fire arm even though he seldom used it in a gun fight. Having a single shot revolver with a 12" barrel didn't give you an advantage. The COLT Peacemaker was the choice of many "Pistolaro's".

    • WARREN - Mar 24th 2017

      5
      The Wyatt Earp Special

      Wyatt Earp carried several different pistols. It depended on the situation. The Buntline Special was mostly used to pistol whip anyone getting out of line. Mr. Earp was a quiet type person. It's the quiet type that should be the one you would watch your back. Loud mouths like the coward Ike Clanton was not much of a worry to the Earp Brothers. Ike was just a loud drunk who shot off his mouth more than he shot a pistol. The Cowboy's who would shoot you in the back and laugh about it were; Tom and Frank McLaury; William "Curly Bill" Brocius; "Buckskin Frank" and Johnny Ringo. Cochise County Sheriff Johnny Behan was a political coward. He had a high paying job but seldom ever enforced the county laws because he associated with The Clanton's, McLaury's, Curly Bill, and Johnny Ringo. In the movie "Tombstone" they credited "Doc" Holiday as Johnny Ringo's killer. The truth is, on July 14, 1882, Ringo's body was found by a neighboring property owner lying against the low fork of the trunk of a large tree in West Turkey Creek Valley, near Chiricahua Peak Arizona. The neighbor had heard a single gunshot around 2 o'clock on the afternoon before the body was found. His feet were wrapped in strips of cloth torn from his undershirt, probably because his horse had gotten loose from its picket and bolted with his boots tied to the saddle—a method commonly used at that time to keep scorpions out of them. There was a bullet hole in his right temple and an exit wound at the back of his head. His revolver had one round expended and was found hanging by one finger in his hand. His horse was found two miles away with his boots still tied to the saddle. A coroner's inquest officially ruled his death a suicide. Wyatt Earp got out of being a Lawman and married a prostitute, and charmer by the name of Josephine Marcus. Josephine was born in New York to a Prussian Jewish family. She moved to Tombstone, AZ. with the promise from County Sheriff John Behan that he would marry her. But when she arrived in Tombstone Behan went back on his promise to marry her. Josephine and Wyatt moved from place to place throughout their life, from one boomtown to another, until they finally bought a cottage in the Sonoran Desert town of Vidal, California on the Colorado River, where they spent the cooler seasons. In the summer they retreated to Los Angeles, where Wyatt struck up relationships with some of the early cowboy actors, including William S. Hart and Tom Mix. Wyatt traveled around Los Angeles to movie sets where they were filming cowboy movies. Wyatt tried to negotiate his life's story to several motion picture companies but there were no takers. However, Wyatt was hired many times by different motion picture companies as a "Technical Director". Josephine went to San Francisco in March 1882 and was joined that fall by Wyatt, with whom she remained in a common-law marriage for 46 years until his death January 13,1929, Los Angeles, CA. Wyatt is buried in a Jewish Cemetery financed by his wife Josephine Marcus-Earp. Josephine Marcus-Earp died December 19, 1944, in Los Angeles, CA. Both Wyatt and Josephine are buried in the Marcus Family Plot. When Wyatt died, she secretly buried him in the Marcus family plot in the Jewish Hills of Eternity Memorial Park in Colma, California. Her body was cremated and buried next to Wyatt's remains. You've heard the legends, now you've heard the truth. The COLT Buntline 44 became Wyatt's trade mark fire arm even though he seldom used it in a gun fight. Having a single shot revolver with a 12" barrel didn't give you an advantage. The COLT Peacemaker was the choice of many "Pistolaro's".

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